Blog

In Taken's blog, our team includes information about the hosts, series creators, and crew, recent articles carefully curated from reliable sources, and pieces of information on the issues related to Canada's MMIWG.

Join us on Facebook and Twitter. Please use the hashtag #takentheseries when talking about the series or the cases.

Blog

Oma KÁ OTINÍCIK kika kí wápátén oko oci ká nókosicik ékwa kákí atoskátakik é-acimícik, ékwa mína kika kí wápátén kwayaskomowéwin ékoni oko oci Kanata MMIWG.

Kika kí wíciwánáwaw ota oma Facebook ékwa Twitter ká icikátéki. Anima apacíta hashtag #takentheseries oma ká animótaman oko acimowina.

Latest Posts

The Great Beginning of Turtle Island

The Great Beginning of Turtle Island

Photo Courtesy of J.B Thomas By Katarina Ziervogel If you live in North America, you might be familiar with the word “Turtle Island”. It is what Indigenous People call the continent of North America as “Turtle Island”. In Ojibwe, we see the Turtle Island as the whole world. Below is a Creation tale behind the name “Turtle Island” – which, frankly, sounds cooler than North America. It all started with the Creator of the large universe, Kitchi-Manitou who watched after every creation in the universe, especially the Mother Earth. On the nickel-silver moon in the lonely sky, there lived a feminine spirit Geezhigo-Quae, the Sky Woman, who joined the Creator in bearing his children with her love and nurture. Soon after, Geezhigo-Quae was pregnant with Kitchi-Manitou’s children. To prepare for the birth, she went down to the Mother Earth herself,…

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#Resistance150

#Resistance150

Photo Courtesy of Wayne Glowacki  By Katarina Ziervogel Last year’s Canada Day stood out from any celebrations in the entirety of Canada’s history. Why? In the wake of Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the MMIWG inquiry ongoing, the Government of Canada celebrated the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. It marked the celebration as a historic event across the country with several large Canada-based corporations participating in the 150th anniversary. The iconic Canada 150 signs were installed in cities across the country. The controversy behind the 150th anniversary of Canada has gained attention among all Indigenous communities due to the tendentious, unforgettable events of Canada’s history and its relationship with Indigenous People. The hashtag #Resistance150 was created to spread awareness of how Indigenous Peoples have suffered at the hands of colonialism, cultural genocide, and brutal assimilation tactics for more than 150…

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The Sixties Scoop Settlement

The Sixties Scoop Settlement

Photo Courtesy of Sixties Scoop Ontario  By Katarina Ziervogel In the Sixties, there was the Vietnam War, civil rights protest, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and political assassinations—all of which were the major events. What people did not consider a major event of a world-changing decade was the Sixties Scoops that occurred in North America. The “Sixties Scoop” is one of many attempts at erasing Indigenous Peoples’ culture, history, and language. The Government of Canada and the United States arranged a massive act of removal, “scooping” many Indigenous children from their families, homes and community into a predominantly non-Indigenous, middle-class families across the North America, and in the process of stripping many Indigenous children of their cultural identity, which left them feeling completely alienated within the predominantly non-Indigenous society due to the severe lack of exposure with their own culture and…

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The History of National Indigenous Peoples Day

The History of National Indigenous Peoples Day

Photo Courtesy of Government of Canada By Katarina Ziervogel National Indigenous Peoples Day is coming up this Thursday on June 21st. Not many people know about the history of the day that is dedicated to Indigenous Peoples. The celebration brings the whole community across Canada together, educates non-Indigenous peoples in Canada, and spreads awareness of how important it is to respect and be aware of Indigenous Peoples’ history, culture, and language. It all started in 1982. The former National Indian Brotherhood at that time (now known as the Assembly of First Nations) called for a day utterly dedicated to Indigenous peoples. Hence it named “National Aboriginal Solidarity Day”. But the day dedicated to the celebration of Indigenous Peoples and their own culture was not made official until June 21 in 1996. It was marked as an official day, “National Aboriginal…

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Saving a Dying Language

Saving a Dying Language

(Image Courtesy of Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press) By Katarina Ziervogel SAVING A DYING LANGUAGE First Nations languages are the essence of and share a great part in many cultures. Language keeps hundreds of years of First Nations’ culture alive and well through the spoken and written words that have a different interpretation than in the English language. Woefully, many of the First Nations languages were forgotten or erased in the process of European colonization during the 15th century. Today, there are very few languages that remain alive in Indigenous communities. In Nunavut and the Northwest Territories around where the Inuit communities are (Cambridge Bay, Kugluktuk, and Ulukhaktok), their language, Inuinnaqtun, is often spoken by the elders, but not the younger generation due to a grim result of the residential schools. Alas, the communication between the younger generations and older generations is not…

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