Blog

In Taken's blog, our team includes information about the hosts, series creators, and crew, recent articles carefully curated from reliable sources, and pieces of information on the issues related to Canada's MMIWG.

Join us on Facebook and Twitter. Please use the hashtag #takentheseries when talking about the series or the cases.

Blog

Oma KÁ OTINÍCIK kika kí wápátén oko oci ká nókosicik ékwa kákí atoskátakik é-acimícik, ékwa mína kika kí wápátén kwayaskomowéwin ékoni oko oci Kanata MMIWG.

Kika kí wíciwánáwaw ota oma Facebook ékwa Twitter ká icikátéki. Anima apacíta hashtag #takentheseries oma ká animótaman oko acimowina.

Latest Posts

Why Homelessness Makes No Sense

Why Homelessness Makes No Sense

by Katarina Ziervogel Next week, from October 25-27, the National Conference on Ending Homelessness will take place in Winnipeg. Here Katarina Ziervogel writes about the vulnerabilities for homeless people, and why we must work together to end homelessness.   Annually, 235,000 Canadians experience homelessness on a range from mild to severe form. It is one of the biggest issues in Canada today, and the question is why and how important it is to end homelessness.   Living on the street can have a negative impact on an individual’s mental and physical health, regardless of the background they emerged from. Not only are they prone to developing mental illnesses, such as depression but they are prone to physical illnesses such as tuberculosis and nutritional defence. Unfortunately, the worst of all, the exposure to living on the street can lead to the…

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Indigenous Fashion Week

by Katarina Ziervogel   In the beautiful British Columbia, Vancouver, the first of Vancouver’s Indigenous Fashion Week was held for four days between July 26th and July 19th at Queen Elizabeth Theatre Atrium. It celebrated cultural appreciation for Indigenous designers and artists, instead of having their artwork appropriated by others. Indigenous-based design was featured, as done by 32 Indigenous designers. Indigenous models represented the designers’ artwork on the catwalk, which is uncommon in the fashion world and in the media. It is necessary to ensure that Indigenous communities have true representatives of themselves to the public, as it will increase awareness of what’s going on inside Indigenous communities and sensitivity towards their culture, traditions and history. This article from the Globe and Mail highlights how important it is to appreciate Indigenous culture, instead of stealing from it and making it…

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Four Sacred Medicines – Cedar

  by Katarina Ziervogel On this website, there is an e-ceremony and e-smudge available to honour the families and of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous women with four Sacred Medicines (Tobacco, Sage, Cedar, Sweetgrass) to choose from. Four Sacred Medicines comes from one of the First Nations’ tribe Anishinaabe. But the sacred medicines are used widely for all Indigenous people within their prayers, rituals, and healing circles within the community and our people. Many cultures and religions use plant medicines for several reasons. In Anishinaabe and for all Indigenous people, this is best known as smudging. Each of four Sacred Medicine has its own healing for specific areas to a human being or the environment. Cedar is the South of the four Sacred Medicines. Cedar can be used in a different way, such as brewing into tea, cedar bath, or…

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Four Sacred Medicines – Sweetgrass

by Katarina Ziervogel   On this website, there is an e-ceremony and e-smudge available to honour the families and of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous women with four Sacred Medicines (Tobacco, Sage, Cedar, Sweetgrass) to choose from. Four Sacred Medicines comes from one of the First Nations’ tribe Anishinaabe. But the sacred medicines are used widely for all Indigenous people within their prayers, rituals, and healing circles within the community and our people. Many cultures and religions use plant medicines for several reasons. In Anishinaabe and for all Indigenous people, this is best known as smudging. Each of four Sacred Medicine has its own healing for specific areas to a human being or the environment. Sweetgrass is the North of the four Sacred Medicines. It shares a deep and sacred connection to Mother Earth, and some people may wonder why…

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Four Sacred Medicines – Sage

by Katarina Ziervogel   On this website, there is an e-ceremony and e-smudge available to honour the families and of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous women with four Sacred Medicines (Tobacco, Sage, Cedar, Sweetgrass) to choose from. Four Sacred Medicines comes from one of the First Nations’ tribe Anishinaabe. But the sacred medicines are used widely for all Indigenous people within their prayers, rituals, and healing circles within the community and our people. Many cultures and religions use plant medicines for several reasons. In Anishinaabe and for all Indigenous people, this is best known as smudging. Each of four Sacred Medicine has its own healing for specific areas to a human being or the environment. Sage is the West of the four Sacred Medicines. It is used to release one person or more of its negativity and deep troubles. In…

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