Blog

In Taken's blog, our team includes information about the hosts, series creators, and crew, recent articles carefully curated from reliable sources, and pieces of information on the issues related to Canada's MMIWG.

Join us on Facebook and Twitter. Please use the hashtag #takentheseries when talking about the series or the cases.

Blog

Oma KÁ OTINÍCIK kika kí wápátén oko oci ká nókosicik ékwa kákí atoskátakik é-acimícik, ékwa mína kika kí wápátén kwayaskomowéwin ékoni oko oci Kanata MMIWG.

Kika kí wíciwánáwaw ota oma Facebook ékwa Twitter ká icikátéki. Anima apacíta hashtag #takentheseries oma ká animótaman oko acimowina.

Latest Posts

How the Animal Activism is Hurting the Inuit Sealing Hunt

In the light of global warming and the environment on the decline, international citizens are being called to action to make the change in their daily lifestyle in order to make an effective change for Mother Earth. One of these calls to action is the removal of meat-eating in their dietary plan—one of the elements of animal rights activism. An Indigenous-owned and operated restaurant, Kū-kŭm Kitchen in Toronto has been gaining a fair amount of controversy by animal rights activists due to the seal meat inside two dishes on the menu. This highlights an uneasy, strained relationship between Indigenous communities and animal rights activists due to the Inuit People’s long-time struggles and frustration with the hardship of their economy to keep afloat because of the seal hunting ban and its anti-sealing campaigns, organizations, and groups. The Inuit communities believe that…

Read More

August Civic Holiday

Looking back on childhood, the summer seemed to be endless six weeks of freedom when we were allowed to do whatever we wanted. As an adult, the long weekends are the only days of the summer that gave us the taste of the same freedom we once had when we were kids. This recent long weekend of August was one of the last opportunities for young adults, families, and college students to trade in city life for the wilderness, camping, and all night long bonfires filled with traditional s’mores, storytelling, and laughter that echoed in hundred miles of the forest. Traditionally, the August long weekend is known as the Civic Holiday. What is Civic Holiday? It’s the most used name for a public holiday on the first Monday of August, and it is one of the most celebrated holidays in…

Read More
The Great Beginning of Turtle Island

The Great Beginning of Turtle Island

Photo Courtesy of J.B Thomas By Katarina Ziervogel If you live in North America, you might be familiar with the word “Turtle Island”. It is what Indigenous People call the continent of North America as “Turtle Island”. In Ojibwe, we see the Turtle Island as the whole world. Below is a Creation tale behind the name “Turtle Island” – which, frankly, sounds cooler than North America. It all started with the Creator of the large universe, Kitchi-Manitou who watched after every creation in the universe, especially the Mother Earth. On the nickel-silver moon in the lonely sky, there lived a feminine spirit Geezhigo-Quae, the Sky Woman, who joined the Creator in bearing his children with her love and nurture. Soon after, Geezhigo-Quae was pregnant with Kitchi-Manitou’s children. To prepare for the birth, she went down to the Mother Earth herself,…

Read More
#Resistance150

#Resistance150

Photo Courtesy of Wayne Glowacki  By Katarina Ziervogel Last year’s Canada Day stood out from any celebrations in the entirety of Canada’s history. Why? In the wake of Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the MMIWG inquiry ongoing, the Government of Canada celebrated the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation. It marked the celebration as a historic event across the country with several large Canada-based corporations participating in the 150th anniversary. The iconic Canada 150 signs were installed in cities across the country. The controversy behind the 150th anniversary of Canada has gained attention among all Indigenous communities due to the tendentious, unforgettable events of Canada’s history and its relationship with Indigenous People. The hashtag #Resistance150 was created to spread awareness of how Indigenous Peoples have suffered at the hands of colonialism, cultural genocide, and brutal assimilation tactics for more than 150…

Read More
The Sixties Scoop Settlement

The Sixties Scoop Settlement

Photo Courtesy of Sixties Scoop Ontario  By Katarina Ziervogel In the Sixties, there was the Vietnam War, civil rights protest, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and political assassinations—all of which were the major events. What people did not consider a major event of a world-changing decade was the Sixties Scoops that occurred in North America. The “Sixties Scoop” is one of many attempts at erasing Indigenous Peoples’ culture, history, and language. The Government of Canada and the United States arranged a massive act of removal, “scooping” many Indigenous children from their families, homes and community into a predominantly non-Indigenous, middle-class families across the North America, and in the process of stripping many Indigenous children of their cultural identity, which left them feeling completely alienated within the predominantly non-Indigenous society due to the severe lack of exposure with their own culture and…

Read More

1237